It’s 20 March, Snowman Burning Day. Do you want to burn a snowman?

American and Swiss citizens blow up snowmen to mark seasons change. Boom!

Snowman Burning Day is derived from a German tradition – the Rose Sunday Festival.

The mayor passes through the town with a straw snowman.  If children have been well-behaved, studied hard and obeyed their parents, the mayor orders a straw snowman to be burned.

On the Lake Superior State University campus, Snowman Burning Day victims are usually built out of recycled paper, wood and wire.

Started in 1971 by the Unicorn Hunters, a campus club, the annual snowman burning has often been built around political issues. In 2009, the snowman represented capitalist greed. In the 1970s, during women’s liberation, the snowman was replaced with a “snow person.” In the 1980s, a “snow clone” was burned to riff off cloning in the news. During the Iran hostage crisis, the Unicorn Hunters burned a Snow Ayatollah Khomeni.

In the 1970s, during women’s liberation, the snowman was replaced with a “snow person.” In the 1980s, a “snow clone” was burned to riff off cloning in the news. During the Iran hostage crisis, the Unicorn Hunters burned a Snow Ayatollah Khomeni.

In 1992, Snowman Burning Day was canceled because of environmental concerns.

It was resumed the following year, however, after a public outcry and media campaign for its reinstatement.

Spring’s almost here.  Time to dust off that blowtorch again.

 

Siobhan O’Shea is a freelance writer. She writes about pretty much everything but especially likes to bring readers’ attention to new tech, marketing, human behavior, and other oddities.